FAQ – Frequently Asked Questions

Click on the question of your choice to see our answer or simply scroll  down the page to read all our frequently asked questions and their answer.

Who can ride at ATRC?
What is the process?
What happens in the first appointment (test ride)?
Can a rider ride less than one time per week?
Are lesson plans created for each rider?
What happens if the participant gets sick?
What style of riding do you teach?
Can I drop off my child for their lesson?
Where do your instructors get their training?
If financial assistance is needed, is there a program to help?
How old do you have to be to volunteer?
Can I obtain educational community services or required volunteer hours at ATRC?
Can I obtain court appointed community service hours at ATRC?
Do you have projects that Scout programs and groups could do?
What type of volunteer opportunities do you have?
Is there a minimum of required hours?
Where do you get your volunteers?
How many horses do you have in your program?
Will any horse do or do you look for specific characteristics?
Do you utilize traditional or non-traditional health care for the horses?
Do you lease, purchase or take donated horses?
If I want to donate a horse, what is the process?
Once your budgeted horse quota has been met, do you still look for new and better horses?
What happens to a horse when it can no longer work in the program?

Who can ride at ATRC?

Anyone with cognitive, emotional or physical challenges can ride.

What is the process?

1. Complete the online rider application and the office will contact you to discuss options and next steps.
2. The office will schedule a time for you to complete the detailed rider application including obtaining a completed Physician’s Form supplied by ATRC. This form must be signed by a physician (MD or DO). Once a completed application, including physician’s signatures are received, a test ride will be scheduled for your first appointment. The first ride is considered a test ride and it is free.

What happens in the first appointment (test ride)?

The first appointment is an evaluation ride of about 15 minutes. We use this ride to evaluate if we have a suitable horse, if your rider will be willing and able to mount a horse, and to establish how our program can best benefit the needs of the rider.

Can a rider ride less than one time per week?

We encourage all riders to ride on a weekly basis to obtain best results from therapy. Muscles can start to deteriate or forget what they have learned after two weeks of no riding.

Are lesson plans created for each rider?

Yes. Lesson plans are developed out of the information obtained from the rider application, physician’s form, family comments, etc. The lesson includes activities that target specific area of need(s) such as: cognitive, emotional and/or physical. The rider will also experience socialization, increased horse knowledge and riding skills, etc. While a lesson is therapy, it is fun!

What happens if the participant gets sick?

Please inform us as soon as possible so that we do not have a team of staff, volunteers and horses waiting on you. It you are running a temperature, you cannot ride for a period of 24 hours. There are no makeups for missed lessons.

What style of riding do you teach?

We are blessed to have a variety of certified instructors who teach many styles of riding. We work to teach balance, strength, and skill, then as the rider progresses we allow them to choose if they like english, western or even vaulting.

Can I drop off my child for their lesson?

No. The responsible individual is to remain with their rider until the rider is placed on the horse. If the responsible individual leaves the arena for any reason, they must return to the arena five (5) minutes prior to dismount.

Where do your instructors get their training?

All our instructors take lessons, go to clinics, and continuously work to improve their education. All instructors are registered PATH (Professional Association for Therapeutic Horsemanship). Many of our instructors are also certified by the Certified Horsemanship Association.

If financial assistance is needed, is there a program to help?

Yes. Many riders are sponsored by family, friends, companies, organizations, etc. If you need assistance, please make that note in your rider application on-line or simply contact our office.

How old do you have to be to volunteer?

All ages are welcome. Ages 13 and under require adult supervision. Background checks are performed.

Can I obtain educational community services or required volunteer hours at ATRC?

Yes.

Can I obtain court appointed community service hours at ATRC?

No.

Do you have projects that Scout programs and groups could do?

Yes, we are always in need of project assistance. Contact the office for opportunities and have a look at have been done in the past here.

What type of volunteer opportunities do you have?

We have three major areas of need, they are:
• Riding Program: horse leader, side walker, tack, feed, muck, facility maintenance, etc.
• Office Assistance: general and specialty, including volunteer coordinator
• Professionals

Click here for more details about volunteering.

Is there a minimum of required hours?

ATRC staff and/or volunteers are always on site. We have horses to feed and care for which is a seven (7) days per week job. Time is a valuable contribution and is needed to better serve our riders and our horses; therefore, whatever time you have to give is much appreciated. There is no minimum requirement.

Where do you get your volunteers?

Volunteer resources include: VolunteerMatch.com, Volunteer Tulsa, educational systems, groups, organizations, family and friends. There is something for everyone.

How many horses do you have in your program?

We have ten (10) horses on site, nine (9) in our program. See Horses and Friends to meet our four-legged therapists.

Will any horse do or do you look for specific characteristics?

Horses are like people, each has its own characteristics. Different traits are chosen depending upon the needs of our riders.

Do you utilize traditional or non-traditional health care for the horses?

Traditional equine treatments and health care are used (i.e., farrier, chiropractic, etc.), anything that a veterinarian would recommend. Routine schedules for all include: health checks, dental, training, work and rest.

Do you lease, purchase or take donated horses?

We do not lease, we purchase when we are looking for a specific characteristic and the majority of our horses are donated.

If I want to donate a horse, what is the process?

Contact our office and request a horse profile form. Requirements include health records and a photo. If the horse has the characteristics we are needing, an onsite visit will be scheduled. If the horse fits our needs, arrangements will be made for delivery or pickup. There is a 90-day trial prior to a final decision.

Once your budgeted horse quota has been met, do you still look for new and better horses?

We are always on the look out to better our program, including the abilities of our horses who serve our riders.

What happens to a horse when it can no longer work in the program?

Our horses have the biggest job on site, they serve riders. If they can no longer perform required tasks, a good home is found. Sometimes they are donated and sometimes they are sold, this is dependent upon the age of the horse and his/her physical or emotional challenges. ATRC horses are family; therefore, we are extremely picky as to where they go. We do everything in our power to ensure they end their life in a wonderful home with lots of love.